The conclusion

I have seen something else under the sun:
The race is not to the swift
or the battle to the strong,
nor does food come to the wise
or wealth to the brilliant
or favor to the learned;
but time and chance happen to them all.

Moreover, no one knows when their hour will come:
As fish are caught in a cruel net,
or birds are taken in a snare,
so people are trapped by evil times
that fall unexpectedly upon them.

Ecclesiastes 9:11-12

So this is how life was explained to me when I was young: study hard, get good grades, find a good job and you will prosper and live a good life. Unfortunately, thats not how life works. Solomon’s observation about life (without a view of God and eternity, thus the constant use of “under the sun”) has led him to conclude that “time and chance happen to them all”. He was absolutely right. Some people study the hardest but never get the grades they deserve while others drop out of college and end up as CEOs and directors of multinational companies. And some never make it beyond their first few years on earth. Life is unpredictable because things don’t always add up.

But for one person, everything adds up just perfectly. For Him, everything makes perfect sense and everything functions just as it is supposed to cymbalta for pain. Nothing surprises Him, nothing is unpredictable because “works out everything in conformity with the purpose of his will” (Ephesians 1:11). He controls every detail of what happens on earth, from small seemingly inconsequential events (Proverbs 16:33) to calamities that claim lives (Isaiah 45:7; Amos 3:6).

So why do we harp on having success, health and wealth as the formula to a good life? God’s will always prevails over man’s best efforts. He can raise up and bring down at any time He wishes. This is not to say that we are supposed to be fatalistic and be bums (scriptures speak specifically against that – Ecclesiastes 10:18; Colossians 3:23; 2 Thessalonians 3:6-12) but I think we need to redefine what we constitutes a good and successful life. Life is much more than evading suffering, having good health and great wealth. I think we need to have an eternal perspective to life.

Even as I write this, I am reminded of Matthew 6:33 again and again.

More than conquerors

The common brand of Christianity looks like this: “Christ suffered so we don’t have to. Suffering and bad circumstances is of the devil. Claim the promises of Christ regarding salvation, health, wealth and success and overcome all the bad stuff.” Naturally, the one who claims more of God’s promises and/or has more faith will be healthier, wealthier and more successful. Health, wealth and success inevitably become the evidence of Christ in a person. Suffering is not of God and even if it is, it’s never for the long term and only for a season. God enables us to conquer life and live abundantly (John 10:10)!

But let me propose a different view.

Who will separate us from the love of Christ? Will trouble, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? As it is written, “For your sake we encounter death all day long; we were considered as sheep to be slaughtered.” No, in all these things we have complete victory (NIV: “more than conquerors”) through him who loved us!
For I am convinced that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor heavenly rulers, nor things that are present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in creation will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.
Romans 8:35-39

Let me bring up 4 truths about living as “more than conquerors”:

  • The centrality of Christ
    Our relationship begins and holds together because of Christ, not our love for God. Romans 8:30 says “And those he predestined, he also called; and those he called, he also justified; and those he justified, he also glorified.” The whole of our salvation reality (some say experience) is the work of Christ- from our predestination, calling, justification and till glorification. It is all God. If any of it were up to us, we’d be in trouble.
  • Christ has conquered so we don’t have to
    When we read “complete victory” and “more than conquerors”, we get a sense of how complete our victory is in Christ. John 16:33 shows us how Jesus sees His reality in our Christian life, “I have told you these things so that in me you may have peace. In the world you have trouble and suffering, but take courage – I have conquered the world.” God isn’t airy fairy pretending that all is well; He says that we will have “trouble and suffering”. At the same time He says that in Him (not outside of Him) we may have peace and in Him we can have courage (because He has conquered).
  • Our victory is not dependent on health or wealth
    Verse 37 doesn’t say over, after or beyond “all these things”, but in. While we are in trouble, distress, persecution, famine, nakedness, danger or sword, our relationship with God remains unchanged. Our health and wealth or suffering and pain is not a reflection of our relationship with God – if it were, we could write off the whole book of Job. Instead, Christ is our measure of victory and our “abundant life” (John 10:10). If health and wealth were our measure of victory, Christ becomes just a vehicle to attain our version of “abundant life”.
  • God’s love penetrates through circumstance in life
    How else can we convey the good news to those incarcerated for life? How else can we give hope to someone on death row? How else do we bring Christ to the terminally ill? The hope that the gospel offers is not limited to or mainly health and wealth, but it is eternal salvation and union with God. This is true hope, that a person living out a life sentence, on death row or terminally ill can have an abundant life! That abundant life IS Christ.

When Christ becomes useful to us to living the abundant life (health, wealth and success), we have lost the plot. We become less than conquerors, rather than attaining to God’s abundant life in Him, we strive for our abundant life through Him. Don’t be fooled into thinking that there is no difference, because there is. If our measuring stick for life is health, wealth and success, we’ve just made that the gold standard – the summit of life (abundant life/life in full). Instead, His call is to focus on Him and His promise is that He will take care of our needs on earth (Matthew 6:33). We need to raise Jesus up to more than just a vehicle for health, wealth and success. We need to dethrone health, wealth and success and enthrone the treasure of Christ (Matthew 13:44-48; Mark 8:36)!