Spit

Then they came to Bethsaida. They brought a blind man to Jesus and asked him to touch him. He took the blind man by the hand and brought him outside of the village. Then he spit on his eyes, placed his hands on his eyes and asked, “Do you see anything?” Regaining his sight he said, “I see people, but they look like trees walking.” Then Jesus placed his hands on the man’s eyes again. And he opened his eyes, his sight was restored, and he saw everything clearly. Jesus sent him home, saying, “Do not even go into the village.”
Mark 8:22-26

Oh no He didn’t. But indeed He did, and not just once (Mark 7:33-37; John 9:1-3, 6-12). Jesus Christ spat on a blind man’s eyes. It’s like adding insult to injury. Why would he do something like that? Here’s something to think about:

  • Deuteronomy 8:3 says “mankind cannot live by bread alone, but also by everything that comes from the Lord’s mouth.” (NET) This man needed more than bread, he needed something from the Lord’s mouth. Spit was indeed one of those things.
  • Illness is often a punishment for sin (Levticus 26:14-16; 2 Chronicles 21:12-15; 1 Corinthians 11:30). Luke 4:18 tells us Jesus’ fulfillment is comprehensive, his work spans from destroying sin to removing infirmities. Jesus spits on sin and it’s curse on the body.
  • Paul labels his “thorn in the flesh” as given to him by a “messanger of Satan” (2 Corinthians 12:7), Job was inflicted with ulcers by the devil (Job 2:6-7). Though not all illness is of the devil, it is often presented as the devil’s work. 1 John 3:8 says ” The reason the Son of God appeared was to destroy the devil’s work.” Jesus effectively spits on the work of the devil.